Dynamic Loading Part Two

You can find Part One here.

Nine months along with HRV, and 15 weeks along with proper training… I wanted to update you on how I’m applying load.


Dealing with Noise

To avoid chasing my tail on a daily basis…

  • Respect the trend
  • Ensure a positive trend before starting each microcycle

Chart from HRV4T.com

Respecting The Trend

Top half of the chart:

  • Blue line – 7 day HRV average
  • Shaded range – 60 day HRV average
  • Colored Bars – how I’m trending
  1. When my “line” gets to the bottom of my shaded range…
  2. When my bar turns orange…

…it is a sign I have disregarded the trend and gone too far.

Because my primary source of overload is Moderate Domain aerobic volume, the fatigue clears in a few days.

In July (lower chart) I made an error that required a week of backing off.

My error was stacking bikes on top of hikes, same day => my muscles are learning to reload themselves and I need to metabolically challenging sessions.


Re-establish The Trend

I have been using a 5:2 loading protocol – the key part is two back-to-back recovery days each week.

Applying what I’ve learned so far:

  • Avoid stacking sessions that tank my metrics the following day
  • Take double-days off every week – tempting to skip when things are going well
  • Evening HRV Via HRV4Biofeedback – get a feel how hard the day hit me
  • Don’t go too deep across the 5-day loading cycle

My evening HRV sometimes goes through the roof on the second recovery day – not sure what to make of that, will keep watching.

Taking all of the above together… something I got from Johan

The most important assessment is how I feel on Day One

“Day One” is the first day of the new training week. Before I get back to loading…

  1. Make sure the positive trend has been re-established
  2. Resist the temptation to carry fatigue into the next microcycle

1 & 2 are tips I completely disregarded as a younger athlete.

So far, I can’t count on being able to recover while loading.


Not All Load is Created Equal

Pay attention to what makes YOU tired.

My Use-With-Caution List

  • Downhill hiking – I’ve started tracking total elevation change to quantify
  • Loading when depleted – my July error of same-day stacking
  • Strength training – lower heart rate but higher stress
  • Running – impact forces
  • Altitude & Heat

Traditional load metrics (TSS, for example) don’t pick up the full spectrum of the fatigue we give ourselves. The metrics I outlined in Part One help.

On loading when depleted – just because I am eating doesn’t mean I am reloading! I’ve had to accept that my body isn’t well-trained to reload itself.

Sunday Summary 17 July 2022

Top Threads

  1. Conor Harris’ active release thread for hip region tightness
  2. Additional Tips on the SART (original blog on dynamic loading)
  3. Coaching people (like me) who already know how to train
  4. My current loading hierarchy
  5. Progressive incline treadmill test with lactate

Workouts & Working Out

High-Performance Habits