Dynamic Loading Part Two

You can find Part One here.

Nine months along with HRV, and 15 weeks along with proper training… I wanted to update you on how I’m applying load.


Dealing with Noise

To avoid chasing my tail on a daily basis…

  • Respect the trend
  • Ensure a positive trend before starting each microcycle

Chart from HRV4T.com

Respecting The Trend

Top half of the chart:

  • Blue line – 7 day HRV average
  • Shaded range – 60 day HRV average
  • Colored Bars – how I’m trending
  1. When my “line” gets to the bottom of my shaded range…
  2. When my bar turns orange…

…it is a sign I have disregarded the trend and gone too far.

Because my primary source of overload is Moderate Domain aerobic volume, the fatigue clears in a few days.

In July (lower chart) I made an error that required a week of backing off.

My error was stacking bikes on top of hikes, same day => my muscles are learning to reload themselves and I need to metabolically challenging sessions.


Re-establish The Trend

I have been using a 5:2 loading protocol – the key part is two back-to-back recovery days each week.

Applying what I’ve learned so far:

  • Avoid stacking sessions that tank my metrics the following day
  • Take double-days off every week – tempting to skip when things are going well
  • Evening HRV Via HRV4Biofeedback – get a feel how hard the day hit me
  • Don’t go too deep across the 5-day loading cycle

My evening HRV sometimes goes through the roof on the second recovery day – not sure what to make of that, will keep watching.

Taking all of the above together… something I got from Johan

The most important assessment is how I feel on Day One

“Day One” is the first day of the new training week. Before I get back to loading…

  1. Make sure the positive trend has been re-established
  2. Resist the temptation to carry fatigue into the next microcycle

1 & 2 are tips I completely disregarded as a younger athlete.

So far, I can’t count on being able to recover while loading.


Not All Load is Created Equal

Pay attention to what makes YOU tired.

My Use-With-Caution List

  • Downhill hiking – I’ve started tracking total elevation change to quantify
  • Loading when depleted – my July error of same-day stacking
  • Strength training – lower heart rate but higher stress
  • Running – impact forces
  • Altitude & Heat

Traditional load metrics (TSS, for example) don’t pick up the full spectrum of the fatigue we give ourselves. The metrics I outlined in Part One help.

On loading when depleted – just because I am eating doesn’t mean I am reloading! I’ve had to accept that my body isn’t well-trained to reload itself.

Sunday Summary 31 July 2022

Top Five Threads

  1. Doing Hard Things based on Steve’s Book
  2. Jason’s Book: Training Essentials – lots of tips (for all) in thread
  3. Steady State LT1 Treadmill Test (3.4mph @ 15%) – sample tips
  4. Mark asks, “Do you let yourself feel superb?”
  5. 8 year build showing gains for my son

Workouts & Working Out

High-Performance Habits